Student Use of Technology: Help or Hindrance

By Kyle Ashley

 La versión en español está disponible al final de este documento.

We live in the age of information revolution, marked by technology innovation, and human capital surpassing physical capital in perceived value. This age is also dominated by a growing population of millennials, born between 1982 and the early 2000’s. That same generation is now the overwhelming majority of undergraduate students in higher education.
Another characteristic of the information age is the continued integration of technology into the traditional classroom environment. This pervasiveness of technology in the classroom begs the question: is student use of technology a help or hindrance?
Over the next few paragraphs I will attempt to shed light on this question. Specifically, this blog discusses the use of technological devices, which include, but are not limited to: laptops and mobile devices (smart phones, tablets, e-books, etc.), by students as they attend classes in a traditional learning environment. This blog will not discuss the integration of technology into effective pedagogy, policies on student/instructor use of technology, technology use in virtual learning environments, or infrastructure and support for Internet-ready devices in higher education. While these application areas are critical to the higher education experience, their discussion will be reserved for future blogs.
Multiple research studies suggest that an increasing number of students have laptops and mobile devices in the classroom (Wright, 2013), and student use of technology is becoming more widespread over time as well. An important question: Does student use of technology actually enhance students’ academic experience, or are students simply checking social media web sites and watching the latest YouTube video to go viral?
To help answer this question, I suggest two areas need to be explored: first, we must immerse ourselves in the millennial culture and gain a greater understanding of how this generation learns; and second, we need to understand the role technology plays in the academic life of students.
Millennials are often referred to as digital natives (Prensky, 2001) as they have literally grown up with technology integrated into nearly every aspect of their lives. Millennials are highly skilled in technology use (Frand, 2000) and learning new technology is accomplished through trial and error. Additionally, millennials are often marked by their acceptance for others, and a strong sense of community, as seen in their prevalent use of social media (Chen, Seilhamer, Bennett, Bauer, 2015). Constant communication with others is taken for granted, as millennials expect immediate and regular communication (Kvavik, 2004). Rather than solve problems, many millennials expect to find answers online. The preferred learning modality is an extension of what is important to millennials; they prefer to experience life, and thus are partial to experiential learning. Students learn by doing and collaborating with others as an integral part of the discovery process (Frand, 2000).
Medical students in a 2014 class at the University of California Irvine scored 23% higher than previous classes, on national exams, because of immediate access to information (Comstock, 2013). It should also be noted that students in this class collaborated with students from the school of Information and Computer Science to develop 19 health apps for mobile devices.
Ability to organize, access, and share information easily was a significant factor in college students’ claims that tablets help them learn more efficiently and perform better in the classroom (Pearson, 2015). The Oklahoma State University News (2011) reported that over 75% of students agreed or strongly agreed the iPad enhanced their learning experience. Students were able to collaborate electronically outside the classroom, and they felt they were able to learn on an “equal playing field” with other students.
A recent study suggested the top five reasons technology had a positive impact on academic experience (Kvavik, 2013):
  1. Communicating better with instructors
  2. Receiving prompt feedback, incorporating feedback into future work
  3. Increasing collaboration and communication with other students
  4. Improving presentation of their work
  5. Using technology to increase opportunities for practice and reinforcement
Clearly, there are reservations regarding students who take laptops and mobile devices. Many instructors prohibit students from having mobile devices in the classroom. This concern over the use of technology in the classroom is shared by students as well. Nearly 50% of students and two-thirds of faculty surveyed had concerns that mobile devices are distractions in traditional learning environments (Dahlstrom and Bichsel, 2014).
Can student use of technology in the classroom be a hindrance to students’ higher education learning experience? Evidence suggests student use of technology in the classroom can be a distraction not only to the individual student, but to other students as well. However, an equally strong claim can be made that technology, and more specifically, mobile devices, not only enhance learning, but students expect and anticipate the integrated use of technology into their educational experience.
It is worth noting that a claim can be made that what has been learned from student use of technology in the classroom may also have strong application in youth and college ministries. A common theme between these research studies, which demonstrate at a minimum, a correlation between and quite possibly causation between student use of technology in the classroom, and perceptions of and/or demonstrated increase in effectiveness of learning, is the fact that studies focus on post-millenials, i.e. individuals the same approximate age of youth and young adults. Clearly, there is an opportunity for further research to test the hypothesis of student use of technology in church ministries focused on youth and young adults. 
As we prepare this current generation of students to serve in a pastoral, vocational, and secular setting, we are faced with the realization of the interdependency between millennials and technology, and the challenge of responding to their demands for further integration of technology into the higher education and ministry learning experience. I will save that discussion for a future blog…
References:
Becker, D. (2013). Anticipating the Exception, Not the Rule: Forming Policy for Student Use of Technology in the Classroom. Ejournal of Education Policy, Fall 2013.
Chen, B., Seilhamer, R., Bennett, L., Bauer, S. (2015). Students’ Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education. Educause Review.
Comstock, J. (2013). Ipad Equipped Medical School Class Scores 23 Percent Higher on Exams. Mobihealthnews.
Dahlstrom, E. Bichsel, J. (2014). ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology. Educause.
Facer, K. (2012). Taking the 21st Century Seriously: Young People, Education and Socio-Technical Futures. Oxford Review of Education, 38, 1.
Kvavik, R. (2013). Convenience, Communications, and Control: How Students Use Technology. Educause.
Montano, J. (2014). Do Students Have the Right to Use Technology in the Classroom. Top Hat.
Oklahoma State University. (2011). Oklahoma State University iPad Study. Oklahoma State University News.
Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9, 5.
Roberge, G., Gagnon, L. (2014). Impect of Technology Policy in the Higher Education Classroom: Emerging Trands. Ejournal of Education Policy, Spring 2014. 
Ashley

Kyle Ashley serves as the Department Chair of the Business Leadership Program and Assistant Professor at Baptist University of the Américas.

La versión en español  está disponible aquí.

El uso de la tecnología por los/as estudiantes: ¿ayuda u obstáculo?

 Por Kyle Ashley

Traducido por Patricia Gómez

Vivimos en la era de la revolución informática marcada por la innovación tecnológica y donde el capital humano sobrepasa al capital físico en su valor percibido. Esta era es también dominada cada vez más por la generación del milenio; es decir, las personas nacidas entre 1982 y principios del 2000. La gran mayoría de esa generación son ahora estudiantes en la universidad.
Otra característica de la era de la información es la continua integración de la tecnología en el ambiente tradicional del salón de clases. Esta particularidad nos lleva a preguntarnos: ¿Es el uso de la tecnología por el/la estudiante una ayuda o un obstáculo?
En los siguientes párrafos voy a intentar dar una explicación clara a esta pregunta. Este blog específicamente analiza el uso que los/as estudiantes que asisten a clases en un ambiente de aprendizaje tradicional hacen de los aparatos tecnológicos, entre los cuales se incluyen, pero no se limitan a, computadoras portátiles y dispositivos móviles (teléfonos inteligentes, tabletas, libros electrónicos, etc.). Este blog no analizará la integración de la tecnología en la pedagogía eficaz, las políticas del uso de tecnología por el cuerpo estudiantil o docente, el uso de la tecnología en un ambiente de aprendizaje virtual o la infraestructura y el apoyo que ofrecen los dispositivos con internet a la educación superior. Aunque estas áreas de aplicación son fundamentales para la educación superior, se reservará  su discusión para futuros blogs.
Muchos estudios de investigación sugieren que un creciente número de estudiantes tienen computadoras portátiles y dispositivos móviles en el salón de clases (Wright, 2013), y el uso de la tecnología por parte de ellas/os también se está extendiendo conforme pasa el tiempo. Una pregunta importante es: ¿El uso que estudiantes hacen de la tecnología, ¿en realidad enriquece su experiencia académica, o están simplemente explorando las redes sociales y los sitios de internet para ver el último video de YouTube que se ha hecho viral?
Para ayudar a responder esta pregunta, sugiero dos áreas de exploración: primero, necesitamos sumergirnos en la cultura de la generación del milenio y adquirir una mayor comprensión de cómo esta generación aprende; y segundo, necesitamos entender el papel que la tecnología juega en la vida académica de las/os estudiantes.
La generación del milenio es usualmente conocida como una generación de natos/as digitales (Prensky, 2001), ya que han crecido literalmente con la tecnología integrada prácticamente en cada área de sus vidas. Esta generación está altamente calificada en el uso de la tecnología (Frand, 2000) y logra aprender nueva tecnología a base de un proceso de experimento y error. Además, la generación del milenio generalmente se distingue por su alto grado de aceptación de las demás personas y por un fuerte sentido de comunidad, como se ve en su uso frecuente de los medios de comunicación social (Chen, Seilhamer, Bennett, Bauer, 2015). Se da por hecho una comunicación constante con otras personas, ya que esperan entablar una comunicación  inmediata y regular (Kvavik, 2004). En lugar de resolver problemas, muchos de ellas/os esperan encontrar respuestas en línea. Su modalidad preferida de aprendizaje es una extensión de lo que es importante para la generación del milenio; prefieren experimentar la vida, y por lo tanto tienen una inclinación al aprendizaje experimental. Aprenden haciendo y colaborando con otras personas como parte integral del proceso de descubrimiento (Frand, 2000).  
En el 2014, estudiantes de Medicina de la Universidad de Irvine, California, obtuvieron un puntaje 23% más alto que las generaciones anteriores en los exámenes nacionales, debido al acceso inmediato a la información (Comstock, 2013). Debe señalarse también que los/as estudiantes de esta generación colaboraron con estudiantes de la Facultad de Informática y Sistemas Computacionales para desarrollar 19 aplicaciones (apps) de salud para dispositivos móviles.
La capacidad para organizar, tener acceso a y compartir la información más fácilmente fue un factor importante para que estudiantes de universidad afirmaran que las tabletas les ayudaron a aprender más eficientemente y a tener un mejor desempeño en el salón de clases (Pearson, 2015). El periódico de la Universidad del Estado de Oklahoma (2011) reportó que más del 75% de los/as estudiantes estuvieron de acuerdo o afirmaron enfáticamente que la tableta les ayudó en su educación. Pudieron colaborar electrónicamente fuera del salón de clases y sintieron que aprendieron en “igualdad de condiciones” con otros/as estudiantes.
Un estudio reciente sugiere cinco razones principales por las cuales la tecnología ha tenido un impacto positivo en el aprendizaje académico (Kvavik, 2013):
1. Una mejor comunicación con los/as instructores.
2. El recibir retroalimentación más rápida e incorporarla a trabajos futuros
3. Mayor colaboración y comunicación con otros/as estudiantes
4. Mejores presentaciones de sus trabajos
5. Uso de tecnología para incrementar las oportunidades de práctica y reforzamiento
Evidentemente, el hecho de que los/as estudiantes lleven a clase computadoras portátiles y dispositivos móviles es un asunto que se toma con reservas. Un gran número de instructores/as prohíben el uso de dispositivos móviles; asimismo, estudiantes comparten la preocupación sobre el uso de la tecnología en el salón de clase. Casi el 50% de los/as estudiantes y dos tercios del profesorado encuestados expresaron preocupación de que los dispositivos móviles son una distracción en una atmósfera de aprendizaje tradicional (Dahlstrom and Bichsel, 2014).
¿Puede el uso que estudiantes hace de la tecnología en el salón de clase ser un obstáculo para el aprendizaje en su educación superior? La evidencia sugiere que puede ser una distracción no tan solo para él o ella personalmente, sino también para otros/as estudiantes. Sin embargo, de igual modo puede argüirse que la tecnología, y más específicamente los dispositivos móviles, no solo ayudan en el aprendizaje, sino que los/as estudiantes esperan y dan por hecho la integración del uso de la tecnología en su educación. 
Cabe destacar que es posible afirmar que lo que se ha aprendido del uso de la tecnología en el salón de clase puede ser de gran utilidad en ministerios con jóvenes y universitarios/as. Un tema común en los estudios de investigación, que por lo menos demuestran una conexión y posiblemente una relación causal entre el uso de tecnología por el/la estudiante en el salón de clase y las percepciones que evidencian un aumento demostrado en el rendimiento del aprendizaje, es el hecho de que los estudios se enfocan en la generación del posmilenio; es decir, personas cuyas edades se aproximan a las de jóvenes y adultos jóvenes. Evidentemente, hay oportunidad para que futuras investigaciones puedan probar la hipótesis del uso de tecnología por estudiantes en ministerios de la iglesia que se enfocan en jóvenes y adultos jóvenes.
Al preparar a esta generación actual de estudiantes para servir en un contexto pastoral, secular y profesional, nos enfrentamos con el descubrimiento de la interdependencia entre la generación del milenio y la tecnología, y con el desafío de responder a las exigencias de una mayor integración de la tecnología a la educación superior y ministerial. Guardaré esta discusión para un futuro blog…
Referencias:
Becker, D. (2013). Anticipating the Exception, Not the Rule: Forming Policy for Student Use of Technology in the Classroom. Ejournal of Education Policy, Fall 2013.
Chen, B., Seilhamer, R., Bennett, L., Bauer, S. (2015). Students’ Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education. Educause Review.
Comstock, J. (2013). iPad Equipped Medical School Class Scores 23 Percent Higher on Exams. Mobihealthnews.
Dahlstrom, E. Bichsel, J. (2014). ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology. Educause.
Facer, K. (2012). Taking the 21st Century Seriously: Young People, Education and Socio-Technical Futures. Oxford Review of Education, 38, 1.
Kvavik, R. (2013). Convenience, Communications, and Control: How Students Use Technology. Educause.
Montano, J. (2014). Do Students Have the Right to Use Technology in the Classroom. Top Hat.
Oklahoma State University. (2011). Oklahoma State University iPad Study. Oklahoma State University News.
Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9, 5.
Roberge, G., Gagnon, L. (2014). Impact of Technology Policy in the Higher Education Classroom: Emerging Trands. Ejournal of Education Policy, Spring 2014.
 Ashley

El profesor Kyle Ashley es Director del Departamento de Liderazgo Empresarial y Profesor Asistente en la Universidad Bautista de las Américas.

Esta traducción es posible gracias al Departamento de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad Bautista de las Américas.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s