The Church’s Response to Postmodernism

By Rick McClatchy

La versión en español está disponible al final de este documento.

Introduction
Barna found that 48% of the USA population were post-Christian, meaning they either disbelieved in God or they were no longer participating in the life of the church.[i] Of course many of those who are no longer participating in the church do identify themselves as Christians, and a better term to describe them would be post-Church, meaning they have left the church but not necessarily Christianity. Their number is growing according to Pew at about 1% per year.[ii] A significant portion of these people have adopted a postmodern perspective, to which the church has failed to adequately respond. My desire is to suggest ways that the church can reach out to the growing postmodern population that has left the church.
The Postmodern Challenge
Postmodern people desire to experience God in their daily life rather than to simply know theology. Therefore, churches must change their practices of spiritual formation from a rational approach to an experiential approach. A recent study on Christian practices of spiritual formation found the top three responses were—prayer, Bible Study, and reading a book on a spiritual topic. That same study found that those not connected with the church engaged in spiritual formation in another manner. Their top three responses were spending time in nature for reflection, meditation, and practicing silence or solitude.[iii] This study reveals that postmoderns are not wanting to go to a Bible study where they spend a short time in prayer and then study biblical/theological data. That whole approach is too rationally oriented. They are looking for ways to experience God in their life now. 
The church will need to do two major things to connect with the experience-oriented, post-modern population: 1) change its processes of spiritual formation and 2) develop a group of lay people capable of becoming spiritual friends to the disconnected postmoderns.
Changing the Process of Spiritual Formation
Churches would be more effective in connecting with postmoderns if they made their spiritual formation process more experience oriented. One way to do this is to use nature as part of the church’s spiritual practice. The biblical writers were well aware of how nature can connect us with God, e.g. Psalm 19, Romans 1:19-20. Examining the Christian mystical tradition would be a good place for churches to enhance their understanding of a spirituality connected to nature.[iv] A two-volume work by Steven Chase provides exercises on how to use nature as part of one’s spiritual practice.[v]              
Also, expanding the use of contemplative practices such as Lectio Divina and centering prayer would be very helpful, since these practices use solitude and a more meditative approach. Lectio Divina’s practice of scripture reading, meditation, and prayer to promote communion with God is better designed to appeal to people’s desire to experience God than the traditional Bible study class which is designed to convey biblical information. Centering prayer is a method of silent prayerful meditation and openness, which enables one to be aware of God’s presence in and around us.
Developing Lay Spiritual Friends
Certainly, the above additions of immersion in nature, Lectio Divina, centering prayer, and other practices from the Christian mystical tradition would be great additions to the Church’s move from a rational-oriented spirituality to an experience-oriented spirituality. However, those changes are only helpful if one can get postmodern people to participate in the church’s spiritual formation exercises–a prospect that is not too likely. In most cases, one will have to make initial spiritual connections with these people outside of church settings. 
To make these connections outside of church settings, the church will need to develop the practice of reversed hospitality by going into the community and receiving the hospitality extended by others to them. This was the general practice of Jesus, and he instructed the seventy in this method.[vi]                       
Therefore, most churches would be wise to develop a large pool of lay people who could become spiritual friends that could assist people on their spiritual journey and comfortably engage with the spiritual questions that arise in everyday conversations.[vii] One of the major challenges facing lay people who become spiritual friends is that they will need to be very comfortable and competent in dealing with the emerging postmodern spirituality. This postmodern spirituality works with four major values:
      • Spiritual living embraces awe and wonder.[viii]      
      • Spiritual living is a journey of growth and discovery.[ix]  
      • Spiritual living accepts doubt and mystery.[x]        
      • Spiritual living moves toward community life that is accepting and non-institutional.
Also, these spiritual friends would need to be people who learn to ask important questions in spiritual conversations that arise, such as:[xi]
      • When was the last time you experienced awe?
      • Do you think that feelings of awe and wonder are opening us up to deeper dimension of human experience and reality?
      • Do you think doubt plays a role in our spiritual journey?
      • What gives you hope?
The assumption behind such questions is that the Cosmic Christ, the agent of creation who fills the universe (John 5:1-5, Eph. 4:10, Col 1:15-17, Heb 1:1-3), has already been at work in a person’s life. This will require intense and deep listening by the spiritual friend, which in turn will allow the other person to do some deep listening of how God is communicating with him/her.
Another issue that spiritual friends will need to realize is that some of the people who they engage with outside of the church may never become a member of the church. The trend of the deinstitutionalization of spirituality will make it difficult to connect the church with these people’s spiritual journey. However, strong personal spiritual friendships with people in the church, along with the offering of spiritual formation practices as outlined above will provide the church the best opportunity of connecting with postmodern people.
Conclusion
The church can reach the growing postmodern population but it will require that the church adopt new ways of connecting people with the message of Jesus. The church has done this many times in the past and can do so again.

rick mcclatchy

Dr. Rick McClatchy is State Coordinator for the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of Texas and an adjunct professor at Baptist University of the Américas.
[i] https://www.barna.com/research/state-church-2016/?utm_source=Barna+Update+List&utm_campaign=12907b5d15-The_State_of_the_Church_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8560a0e52e-12907b5d15-180567977&mc_cid=12907b5d15&mc_eid=f12eac33ff#.V9wB_5grI_x
[ii] Pew Research Center, “America’s Changing Religious Landscape” (May 12, 2015) http://www.pewforum.org/2015/05/12/americas-changing-religious-landscape/.
[iii] Jeff Brumley, “Contemplative practices can lure the ‘spiritual but not religious’ to Christianity, expert says”, Baptist News Global (April 21, 2017) https://baptistnews.com/contemplative-practices-can-lure-spiritual-not-religious-christianity-expert-says/#WP4vlVKZOu5
[iv] A good book to examine those in the Christian mystical tradition is Carl McColman, Christian Mystics: 108 Seers, Saints, and Sages (Charlottsville, VA: Hampton Roads Publishing, 2016). Another book to introduce laity to the thinking of the Christian mystics is a daily devotional book by Matthew Fox, Christian Mystics: 365 Readings and Meditations (Novato, CA: New World Library, 2011). 
[v] Steven Chase, Nature as Spiritual Practice (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011), and A Field Guide to Nature as Spiritual Practice (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011).
[vi] This insight of reversed hospitality was provided to me by Michael Gregg, pastor at Royal Lane Baptist Church in Dallas. He did a D.Min. project on this topic, “Becoming Strangers: Discovering the Presence of God by Receiving Hospitality Communities Outside Northside Drive Baptist Church” at MacAfee School of Theology in 2014.
[vii] A good book that explores the concept of becoming a spiritual friend to others is Joseph A. Stewart-Sicking, Spiritual Friendship after Religion: Walking with People while the Rules Are Changing (New York: Morehouse Publishing, 2016).
[viii] Jason Silva’s video “Awe” demonstrates this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QyVZrV3d3o&list=PLF7eeGkHcenROE1QnONFRzSRWCBh6LCCx&index=2
[ix] Jason Silva’s video “We Need to be Lost to Find Ourselves” demonstrates this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GlKdGZcP1E
[x] Lesley Hazleton’d book Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto (New York: Riverhead Books, 2016) demonstrate this and her Ted Talk “The Doubt Essential to Faith” https://www.ted.com/talks/lesley_hazleton_the_doubt_essential_to_faith.
[xi] I am deeply indebted to Christopher Mack, minister at Trinity Baptist Church in San Antonio, Texas, for his insights in this area.

La versión en español está disponible aquí.

La respuesta de la Iglesia al postmodernismo

Por: Rick McClatchy

Traducido por Patricia Gómez

Introducción
Barna encontró que el 48% de la población de los Estados Unidos pertenece al post-cristianismo, lo cual significa que dejaron de creen en Dios o que ya no participan activamente en la vida de una iglesia.[i] Sin embargo, muchas de las personas que ya no participan en la iglesia se identifican a sí mismas como cristianas. Por lo tanto, el término que las describiría mejor sería post-iglesia, que significa que han dejado la iglesia, pero no necesariamente el cristianismo. De acuerdo al Centro de Investigación Pew, este número sigue creciendo aproximadamente un 1% al año.[ii] Una parte significante de estas personas ha adoptado una perspectiva postmoderna, a la cual la iglesia no ha respondido adecuadamente. Deseo sugerir formas que la iglesia puede utilizar para alcanzar a esta creciente población postmoderna que ha dejado a la iglesia.
 El desafío postmoderno
 La gente postmoderna desea experimentar a Dios en su vida diaria en vez de simplemente conocer teología. Por lo tanto, las iglesias deben cambiar sus prácticas de formación espiritual de un enfoque racional a un enfoque vivencial. Un estudio reciente sobre prácticas cristianas de formación espiritual encontró que las tres principales son: la oración, el estudio bíblico y la lectura de un libro basado en un tema espiritual. Ese mismo estudio encontró que aquellas personas que no estaban conectadas con la iglesia participaban de la formación espiritual de otra manera. Las tres respuestas principales fueron: pasar tiempo en la naturaleza para reflexionar, meditar y estar a solas o en silencio.[iii] Este estudio revela que la gente posmoderna no quiere ir a un estudio bíblico en el cual se pase un corto tiempo en oración y luego se estudie información bíblica o teológica. Ese enfoque es demasiado racional. Estas personas buscan formas de experimentar a Dios en su vida presente. 
La iglesia tendrá que hacer dos cosas importantes para conectarse con esta población postmoderna, orientada a la experiencia: 1) cambiar sus procesos de formación espiritual, y 2) desarrollar un grupo de gente laica capaz de cultivar amistades espirituales con esta población postmoderna desconectada.
Cambiando el proceso de formación spiritual
Las iglesias serían más eficaces en conectarse mejor con la gente posmoderna si tuvieran un proceso de formación espiritual orientado hacia la experiencia. Una manera de hacer esto es usar la naturaleza como parte de la práctica espiritual de la iglesia. Los escritores bíblicos estaban bien conscientes de cómo la naturaleza puede conectarnos con Dios, vea por ejemplo el Salmo 19 y Romanos 1:19-20. Examinar la tradición mística cristiana sería una buena forma en la cual las iglesias amplíen su entendimiento de una espiritualidad conectada a la naturaleza.[iv] Los dos volúmenes de Steven Chase proporcionan ejercicios sobre el uso de la naturaleza como parte de nuestra práctica espiritual.[v]              
 Además, ampliar el uso de prácticas contemplativas como la Lectio Divina y la oración centrada sería muy útil ya que estas prácticas usan la soledad y un enfoque más meditativo. La práctica de lectura, meditación y oración de la Lectio Divina para promover la comunión con Dios, está mejor diseñada para apelar al deseo de la gente de experimentar a Dios que la clase de estudio bíblico tradicional que está diseñado para transmitir información bíblica. La oración centrada es un método de meditación y apertura silenciosa en la oración que nos permite estar conscientes de la presencia de Dios dentro y alrededor nuestro.
Desarrollando amistades espirituales laicas Ciertamente, el agregar estas prácticas de la inmersión en la naturaleza, la Lectio Divina, la oración centrada, y otras prácticas de la tradición mística cristiana, sería muy bueno para que la iglesia se mueva de una espiritualidad orientada a lo racional a una espiritualidad orientada a la experiencia. Sin embargo, esos cambios sólo son útiles, si se puede lograr que la gente postmoderna participe en los ejercicios de formación espiritual de la iglesia – prospecto que es poco probable. En la mayoría de los casos, se tendrá que hacer conexiones espirituales iniciales con estas personas fuera del entorno de la iglesia. 
Para hacer estas conexiones fuera del entorno de la iglesia, la iglesia deberá desarrollar una práctica de hospitalidad revertida, entrando en la comunidad y recibiendo la hospitalidad que otras personas les brinden. Ésta era la práctica general de Jesús, y él instruyó a los setenta en este método.[vi]                       
 Por lo tanto, sería sabio que la mayoría de las iglesias desarrollaran un grupo amplio de gente laica que pudieran ofrecer amistades espirituales que ayuden a la gente en su trayecto espiritual, y que tomen en serio y apaciblemente las preguntas espirituales que surjan en las conversaciones cotidianas.[vii] Uno de los principales desafíos a los que se enfrentan las personas que ofrecen esta amistad espiritual laica es que tendrán que ser competentes y sentirse cómodas al tratar con la espiritualidad postmoderna emergente. Esta espiritualidad postmoderna trabaja bajo cuatro valores principals: 
  • La vida espiritual abarca el temor reverencial y el maravillarse/asombrarse.[viii]      
  • La vida espiritual es un trayecto de crecimiento y descubrimiento.[ix]  
  • La vida espiritual acepta la duda y el misterio.[x]  
  • La vida espiritual se mueve hacia una vida comunitaria de aceptación, no institucionalizada. 
Además, estas personas, amigas espirituales, necesitarán aprender a hacer preguntas importantes que surjan en las conversaciones espirituales, tales como:[xI]
  • ¿Cuándo fue la última vez que experimentaste una maravilla o un asombro?
  • ¿Crees que los sentimientos de reverencia y asombro nos están abriendo a una dimensión más profunda de la experiencia y realidad humanas?
  • ¿Crees que la duda juega un papel en nuestro trayecto espiritual?
  • ¿Qué te da esperanza?
La suposición detrás de tales preguntas es que el Cristo Cósmico, el agente de la creación que llena el universo (Juan 5:1-5, Efesios 4:10, Colosenses 1:15-17, Hebreos 1:1-3), ha estado trabajando ya en la vida de la persona. Esto requerirá que quienes ofrezcan la amistad espiritual, escuchen intensa y profundamente, lo cual a su vez permitirá a la otra persona escuchar con más profundidad cómo Dios se está comunicando con él o ella.
Otra cosa importante que las personas que ofrecen la amistad espiritual deben de saber es que algunas de las gentes con las que se están relacionando fuera de la iglesia, quizá nunca lleguen a ser parte de la membrecía de la misma. La tendencia de la desinstitucionalización de la espiritualidad hará más difícil el conectar a la iglesia con la trayectoria espiritual de estas personas. Sin embargo, amistades espirituales personales y fuertes con la gente de la iglesia, junto con las prácticas de formación espiritual como las que describí anteriormente, proporcionarán a la iglesia una mejor oportunidad de conectarse con la gente postmoderna.
 Conclusión
 La iglesia puede llegar a la creciente población postmoderna, pero esto requerirá que adopte nuevas formas de conectar a este grupo con el mensaje de Jesús. La iglesia ha hecho esto muchas veces en el pasado y puede hacerlo de nuevo. 
rick mcclatchy
El Dr. Rick McClatchy es coordinador estatal del Cooperative Baptist Fellowship de Texas y profesor adjunto en la Universidad Bautista de las Américas.
[i] https://www.barna.com/research/state-church-2016/?utm_source=Barna+Update+List&utm_campaign=12907b5d15-The_State_of_the_Church_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8560a0e52e-12907b5d15-180567977&mc_cid=12907b5d15&mc_eid=f12eac33ff#.V9wB_5grI_x
[ii] Pew Research Center, “America’s Changing Religious Landscape” (May 12, 2015) http://www.pewforum.org/2015/05/12/americas-changing-religious-landscape/.
[iii] Jeff Brumley, “Contemplative practices can lure the ‘spiritual but not religious’ to Christianity, expert says”, Baptist News Global (April 21, 2017) https://baptistnews.com/contemplative-practices-can-lure-spiritual-not-religious-christianity-expert-says/#WP4vlVKZOu5
[iv] Un buen libro para examinar a quienes siguen la tradición mística Cristiana es el de Carl McColman, Christian Mystics: 108 Seers, Saints, and Sages (Charlottsville, VA: Hampton Roads Publishing, 2016). Otro libro para introducir a la gente laica al pensamiento de las personas místicas cristianas es el libro de devocionales diarios de Matthew Fox, Christian Mystics: 365 Readings and Meditations (Novato, CA: New World Library, 2011). 
[v] Steven Chase, Nature as Spiritual Practice (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011), y A Field Guide to Nature as Spiritual Practice (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2011).
[vi] Obtuve esta idea de la hospitalidad revertida de Michael Gregg, pastor at Royal Lane Baptist Church en Dallas. Él hizo su proyecto de doctorado en el ministerio sobre este tema, “Becoming Strangers: Discovering the Presence of God by Receiving Hospitality Communities Outside Northside Drive Baptist Church” at MaAfee School of Theology in 2014.
[vii] Un buen libro que explora el concepto de llegar a ser un amigo/a espiritual es el de Joseph A. Stewart-Sicking, Spiritual Friendship after Religion: Walking with People while the Rules Are Changing (New York: Morehouse Publishing, 2016).
[viii] Este video de Jason Silva demuestra esto. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QyVZrV3d3o&list=PLF7eeGkHcenROE1QnONFRzSRWCBh6LCCx&index=2
[ix] Este video de Jason Silva “We Need to be Lost to Find Ourselves” demuestra esto. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GlKdGZcP1E
[x] El libro de Lesley Hazleton Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto (New York: Riverhead Books, 2016) demuestra esto, y también su Ted Talk “The Doubt Essential to Faith” https://www.ted.com/talks/lesley_hazleton_the_doubt_essential_to_faith.
[xi] Estoy agradecido a Christopher Mack, ministro en Trinity Baptist Church de San Antonio, Texas, por sus ideas en esta área.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s